President Enrique Peña Nieto led the event to mark the entry into force of the New Criminal Justice System throughout the country.

"This is a historic moment for the country. Mexicans can and should be proud of having achieved the most significant legal transformation in the past 100 years.”

In Mexico, since independence, the legal system has been built and refined, through the cultural heritage and work of notable jurists.

However, over time, the Criminal Justice System showed clear signs of exhaustion, particularly in the face of the sharp increase in violence and insecurity reported in the country during the first decade of this century.

It was then that Civil Society raised its voice with unprecedented vigor to demand and contribute to a qualitative change in criminal justice.

“With a constructive spirit, tenacity and perseverance, it managed to persuade the Mexican State as a whole to carry out an unprecedented effort of institutional transformation. That is precisely what we are celebrating today.”

Implementation, actions and challenges

Completion of the implementation of the new Criminal Justice System constitutes a key step in providing society with closer, more transparent and effective justice.

This transformation is the result of a collective effort: 

The Coordination Council for the Implementation of the Criminal Justice System and its Technical Secretariat led the efforts to meet the deadline set in the Constitutional Reform.

Locally, the governors and the Mayor of Mexico City firmly advocated the process. This has been borne out by the training of over 400,000 operators of the system and more than 240,000 public security officers.

Likewise, prosecutors' offices have embarked on an ambitious process of modernization and internal restructuring to keep pace with this transformation.

Twenty-one federal and national laws were created or reformed and over 350 local laws were changed. 

Today, Mexico has new laws, new institutions, new processes and even new physical spaces, to transform Criminal Justice.

“But the most important thing is for people to assume the significance of the change we are undertaking. In this way, we will enable the law to achieve its highest purpose: providing justice.

Let us make the new system the emblem of a country committed to legality and the rule of law.”